The Moving Image – at Hove Museum

Press release
Hove Museum & Art Gallery
Opens 9 March 2010
See movement and time unfold in a new exhibition at Hove Museum. Designed with children in mind, The Moving Image contrasts how movement is shown in both photography and art.

Eadweard Muybridge was a 19th century photographer who was the first to develop photographic sequences of moving objects. Placing studies in his famous series Animal Locomotion alongside paintings, engravings and drawings selected from Brighton & Hove Museums’ Fine Art Collection, reveals how artists can represent movement even within a static image.

Muybridge’s studies – including cats, horses and elephants – show his understanding of motion as an event taking place in a sequence of phases. Traditionally in fine art, however, movement is communicated through a single significant moment.  The Moving Image illustrates the many ways in which we can ‘see’ movement and time unfold.

The Moving Image continues in the Fine Art gallery on the upper floor of Hove Museum until September 2010.  Admission is free.

Information for editors
Eadweard J Muybridge (1830–1904) was an English photographer known primarily for his pioneering use of multiple cameras to capture motion, and his zoopraxiscope, a device for projecting motion pictures that pre-dated the flexible perforated film strip that is used today.

Hove Museum also houses a gallery dedicated to the early pioneers of British film.

The Moving Image will be accompanied by activities for families, such as the creation of flicker-books and optical toys. For details, see What’s On at www.brighton-hove-museums.org.uk

Hove Museum & Art Gallery
19 New Church Road, Hove BN3 4AB
03000 290900
http://www.brighton-hove-museums.org.uk
Open Tuesday-Saturday 10am-5pm, Sunday 2-5pm
Closed Monday (including public holidays); Good Friday, 24, 25 & 26 December
Free admission
Fully accessible
Café, shop

Press enquiries:
Marketing & Audience Development 03000 290906

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