Central America albums online

Volcano of Agua. A view of clouds. (Boston Athenaeum)

http://www.bostonathenaeum.org/node/813

The Boston Athenaeum has put all 202 photographs from its 2-album set of Muybridge’s views of Guatemala and Panama, online. Many of these images have never been republished in printed form, so this is a very welcome development.

Central America album. (Boston Athenaeum)

Eadweard Muybridge • Central America • 1876

Eadweard Muybridge Photograph Album of Central America, Vols. I and II
Eadweard Muybridge (Kingston, England 1830 – 1904 Kingston, England)
Central America. Illustrated by Muybridge, 1876
San Francisco, California: Eadweard Muybridge, 1876
Boston Athenæum purchase, Appleton Fund, 1878

From the website:

“In February 1875, Eadweard Muybridge boarded a Pacific Mail Steamship Company vessel in San Francisco bound for Central America, where he would photograph the localities served by the company’s freight and passenger business. It was expected that Muybridge’s photographs, when distributed and shown at international exhibitions, would encourage tourism and investment. He traveled for nine months to Panama, Costa Rica, Honduras and El Salvador. His final stop was Guatemala, where he spent six months documenting its principal towns and coffee plantations.

Champerico. Hauling a Launch on shore. (Boston Athenaeum)

Back in San Francisco, Muybridge enhanced the photographs, adding cloudscapes and moonlight to images already featuring towering volcanoes, tropical vegetation, Spanish-colonial architecture, and indigenous populations. Muybridge made a number of albums for presentation to the appropriate people. The Boston Athenæum’s two bound volumes contain a total of 202 photographs, some are signed Muybridge on the negative and are the most complete record of Muybridge’s Central American journey.”

The time-frozen waves in this photograph indicate that short exposures, already experimented with in 1872 or 73, were coming within Muybridge’s technical reach.

Posted here by Stephen Herbert

National Inventors Hall of Fame: Muybridge is 2011 inductee

Announced March 3:

Eadweard Muybridge is to be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame on May 4th.

Alexandria VA (March 3, 2011)—Continuing to celebrate its mission of recognizing and fostering invention, the National Inventors Hall of Fame has announced its 2011 Inductees.  The life-changing innovations that have come about through this year’s class include the sensor that makes cameras in today’s cell phones possible, the battery that powers most implantable defibrillators, and the basis of exchanging secure information over the Internet.

This year’s ‘Living Inductees’ include Steve Sasson, for the Digital Camera. In 1975, Kodak engineer Steve Sasson created a device that captured an image, converted it to an electronic signal, digitized the signal, and stored the image—the first digital camera.

2011 Historical inductees with achievements related to photography and motion pictures include:
Thomas Armat (1866-1948), Motion Picture Projector
Hannibal Goodwin (1822-1900), Transparent Flexible Nitrocellulose Film
Frederick Ives (1856-1937), Color Photography
Charles F. Jenkins (1867-1934), Motion Picture Projector
Eadweard Muybridge (1830-1904), Stop Action Photography

Thomas Armat

Hannibal Goodwin

Frederick Ives

Charles F. Jenkins

Eadweard Muybridge

 

 

 

 

 

National Inventors Hall of Fame

Announces 2011 Inductees
Inventors of Digital Camera, First Bar Code, Industrial Robot, and Defibrillator Batteries to be Honored

Alexandria VA (March 3, 2011)—Continuing to celebrate its mission of recognizing and fostering invention, the National Inventors Hall of Fame has announced its 2011 Inductees.  The life-changing innovations that have come about through this year’s class include the sensor that makes cameras in today’s cell phones possible, the battery that powers most implantable defibrillators, and the basis of exchanging secure information over the Internet.

This year’s Induction ceremony, sponsored in part by the United States Patent and Trademark Office and the Kauffman Foundation, take place on May 4 at the historic Patent Office Building, now the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery, in Washington, D.C.  The location is particularly appropriate because this year’s class of inductees includes a group of 29 historical inventors who will be recognized posthumously, most of whom would have submitted patent applications to the same building where they will be honored.

From Wikipedia:

The National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to recognizing, honoring and encouraging invention and creativity through the administration of its programs. The Hall of Fame honors the men and women responsible for the great technological advances that make human, social and economic progress possible.

The National Inventors Hall of Fame was founded in 1973 on the initiative of H. Hume Mathews, then chairman of the National Council of Patent Law Associations (now called the National Council of Intellectual Property Law Associations).[1] The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office became a cosponsor of the NIHF the following year.[2]

The Hall is currently located in Alexandria, Virginia, with satellite offices in the Washington, D.C., area and in Los Angeles, California. Originally housed in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, the Hall outgrew its location and moved to Akron. Ohio. The Hall of Fame building in Akron, which also housed hands-on interactive exhibits, opened to the public in 1995. The building is currently under construction to build the National Inventors Hall of Fame School Center for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Learning.

During the annual induction ceremony, a new class of inventors is recognized. Inventors must hold a U.S. patent to be considered, and the invention must have contributed to the welfare of mankind and have promoted the progress of science and the useful arts. A National Selection Committee and Blue Ribbon Panel select inductees.

The National Inventors Hall of Fame takes part in physical activities that embody the inventive spirit. The National Inventors Hall of Fame promotes future generations of inventors through Invent Now Kids, a major subsidiary of the organization, and the Collegiate Inventors Competition. In addition, the National Inventors Hall of Fame is involved with many ventures as well as special projects with national partners.

Posted here by Stephen Herbert