Gary Oldman to film ‘Flying Horse’?

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From indiewire.com

“Gary Oldman Eyeing Ralph Fiennes & Benedict Cumberbatch For His Sophomore Directorial Effort ‘Flying Horse’

NEWS: BY KEVIN JAGERNAUTH

It has been seventeen years since Gary Oldman dropped his feature length directorial debut and cult fave “Nil By Mouth,” but he hasn’t yet followed it up anything. Not that he’s been short of ideas. Back in 2011, he said he wanted to team up Colin Firth for an unnamed remake, while in early 2012 he said he had a project about a sex addict he wanted to direct. Well, the good news is that Oldman does have a new directorial effort cooking, and the surprising part is that’s none of those.
Instead, it’s a biopic of Eadweard Muybridge called “Flying Horse,” and even more, he’s seeking his “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” co-stars Benedict Cumberbatch and Ralph Fiennes to star. Penned by Oldman, the movie would tell the story of the photographer instrumental in helping to develop motion pictures. But the movie will focus on the more tabloid part of his life, with Muybridge mudering a theater critic who was had an affair with his wife, and fathered a child in the process. Scandal!

If all goes to plan, Fiennes would take the role of Muybridge, Oldman the smaller role of his attorney and Cumberbatch as the adulterous Harry Larkyns. Scheduling and all that fun stuff needs to be worked out, but the aim is to start shooting in early 2014 (which is also when Cumberbatch is due on the set of Guillermo Del Toro’s “Crimson Peak”).

But it’s exciting news that Oldman is getting back behind the camera, for a story that also inspired an opera by Philip Glass entitled “The Photographer.”

[Posted here by Stephen Herbert] see also:

https://ejmuybridge.wordpress.com/2013/03/19/michael-eklund-to-star-in-muybridge-movie/

The Noble Bronzes at Lucasfilm: Eadweard Muybridge

 

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Sculptor Lawrence Noble explains the various considerations that he had to research and made decisions about, when designing his bronze of Eadweard Muybridge for George Lucas. Well worth taking the time to view this video – Noble is an engaging interviewee.

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More about the project on The Compleat Muybridge website.

Posted here by Stephen Herbert

 

 

Michael Eklund ‘to star in Muybridge movie’

Our first ever quote from The Hollywood Reporter:

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Michael Eklund. Getty Images

“Michael Eklund, the villain in this weekend’s surprise Halle Berry hit The Call, will star in an untitled psychological thriller centering on Eadweard Muybridge.

Muybridge was a world-famous 19th century photographer who took pictures of nude and deformed subjects, found fame with his landscape shots and pioneered motion photography by capturing animals and humans in action and let the way for motion pictures with his zoopraxiscope device. His personal life also was noteworthy: He killed his wife’s lover and received a justifiable homicide verdict.

Kyle Rideout is directing the indie movie, which is being produced by Josh Epstein. The duo also wrote the script, which is based on the play created by Electric Company Theatre. Rideout and Epstein were behind Wait for Rain, a short which won best science fiction/fantasy at last year’s Comic-Con International Film Festival. They also made the playfully eerie short Hop the Twig, which won best short film in Canada on CBC’s Short Film Face Off. The Muybridge project will be their first feature. The plan is to shoot this summer in Vancouver.”

Borys Kit 18 March 2013.

(Posted here by Stephen Herbert)

A lecture by Eadweard Muybridge, this Saturday

MuyInvite

 

http://www.othercinema.com/calendar/index.html

ANALOG CHURCH SAT 12/8: ROURKE + WOOD + KATELUS + RADIOPHONICS +
Indulging our love for forgotten formats and media archeology lore, Jeremy Rourke & Co. debut two live musical performances, The Biography of a Motion Picture Camera and The Paperman May Charleston. Ben Wood, in the apparel of none other than Eadweard Muybridge, affords us a charmed glimpse into those halcyon days of the Magic Lantern. Doug Katelus, as Hammond organist for the night, offers his 16mm Help Keep Film Dead, on the last days of Monaco Lab. Lori Varga, as high priestess for tonight’s “church,” powers up her 4 projectors in Beyond the Frames of Light and Strange Sound. PLUS Russ Forster with an in-person tribute to Bill Lear, inventor of the eponymous jet AND the 8-track tape! AND a half-hr cut of the BBC‘s Alchemists of Sound, on the UK Radiophonic Workshop, boasting Doctor Who composer Delia Derbyshire.*$7.

[Now that’s what I call a “mixed programme”.]

Posted here by Stephen Herbert

Flying Horse, the movie

Bill Douglas in 1972

Inevitably, the name Bill Douglas had to crop up in Muy Blog at some time. I’ve been bumping into Bill, and later his legacy, for almost forty years. The first time was when, as a young projectionist at the National Film Theatre in London, I was screen checking the new 16mm print of his film My Childhood (1972), just before an important showing – perhaps its British premiere. Afterwards I was walking through the foyer and spotted a character standing by the doors, chain smoking and looking very nervous. I remember thinking ‘That’s got to be the director.’ The film won the Silver Lion at the Venice Film Festival, and became the first of a trilogy dramatising Bill’s life. In the 80s I would often see Bill and his lifelong friend Peter Jewell at a weekend book sale or antique photo fair in one of the London hotels, and a few times chatted about treasures acquired, as fellow collectors of books and objects relating to film and pre-cinema. Bill and Peter came to the opening of my 1990 exhibition Magical Lanterns at London’s Museum of the Moving Image (co-curated with Lester Smith) and Lester’s photograph of Bill beside the silhouette lanternist from the extraordinary Bill Douglas feature Comrades (1987) is a favourite that’s often used to illustrate articles about the late director.

Bill died of cancer the following year; as Peter said at his NFT remembrance event, ‘Mr Benson and Mr Hedges killed him.’ For that special remembrance day I was involved in putting together many short out-takes from Comrades, as a one-off presentation.

I remember the flat where Bill and Peter lived in Soho, its walls double and triple lined with books, and was privileged to see some of their collection at Peter’s family home in Devon. After the establishment of the Bill Douglas Centre for the History of Cinema and Popular Culture at Exeter University, the collection’s eventual home, I sat on the Management Board for some years and was responsible, with Richard Crangle, for arranging the original museum display at the Centre. Today this includes a cabinet of Muybridge items, and a full-size print of the 13-panel San Francisco Panorama, copied from the orginal at Kingston Museum. Bill’s last script was for a feature entitled Flying Horse – about Eadweard Muybridge, of course. Which is where we came in.

Flying Horse script. Bill Douglas Centre, University of Exeter

This month in Edinburgh there is to be a Bill Douglas Weekend. In one of the articles promoting the event the Muybridge script is mentioned, and the slight possibility that the movie could yet be made. With the Andy Serkis feature apparently about to go into production, this seems less likely than ever. I have mixed feelings about the possibility of Flying Horse finally being produced. The script could certainly make a good film, but what chance of finding a director who would make it a great one, as Bill surely would have done? His innate understanding of the nature of the cinematic moving picture and how it is created and perceived from a fragmented stream of images – an aspect which must surely be central to any telling of the Muybridge story in the moving picture medium – is unusual, even amongst talented film directors, and the possibilities are only hinted at in the script. What visual poetry Bill Douglas would have made of this extraordinary subject.

Bill Douglas Centre, University of Exeter

The Bill Douglas Weekend is at Craigmillar Art Centre, Newcraighall Road, Edinburgh, on 29-30 of October. The Bill Douglas Trilogy and Comrades have been released on DVD by the BFI, priced £22.99.

 

Posted here by Stephen  Herbert

More about Muybridge at The Horse Hospital


Marek Pytel has been very active in Muybridge-related activities these past couple of years, animating zoopraxiscope discs and animal locomotion plates with great technical skill, combined with real insight into what Muybridge was doing. Now Marek’s initiative in staging the exhibition Muybridge’s Revolver provides an opportunity not only to view original plates from Animal Locomotion, rather than reproductions in books and on the web, but also perhaps to take the opportunity to buy one if you can’t bear to leave without it. Taking advantage of a tranche of plates recently made available by a collector, Marek has adorned the walls of The Horse Hospital – what venue could be more appropriate? – with a great selection, some of which are for sale. There are yet more being offered in the exhibition’s catalogue, which can be seen at the exhibition.

The revolver is of course the Smith and Wesson that Muybridge used to shoot dead his wife’s lover, Harry Larkyns, and a replica of a similar pistol together with a portrait of the old photographer form the exhibition’s centrepiece.

I was very pleased to be asked to lead a discussion in the exhibition space last week, with a small (but beautifully formed) group of participants. The Horse Hospital is very close to Russell Square tube station, and worth a visit just to see the interesting space. But there’s much more than that….

27th Sept 7:30pm FREE: Screening of Thom Andersen’s Eadweard Muybridge Zoopraxographer.

On the evening of 2nd October: Live performance from sound archeologist Aleksander Kolkowski accompanied by Marek Pytel’s film Eadweard Muybridge (£7.50).

2 Herbrand Street, Bloomsbury, WC1N 1HX

http://www.thehorsehospital.com/

Posted here by Stephen Herbert

Muybridge in Three Movements

Films and New Dance in San Francisco…… (Thursday, 26 May)


Muybridge in Three Movements  

Catherine Galasso, choreographer/director
Steve Polta, artistic director/archivist, San Francisco Cinematheque
Rebecca Solnit, author

Phyllis Wattis Theater
7:00 p.m.
Mark Wilson, Motion Studies, 1995, 4 min., 16mm
Hollis Frampton, INGENIVM NOBIS IPSA PVELLA FECIT, 1974, 15 min. excerpt, 16mm
Ken Jacobs, Le Prince: Leeds Bridge 1888, 2005, 6 min., video
Bruce Conner, BREAKAWAY, 1966, 5 min., 16mm

In conjunction with the exhibition Helios: Eadweard Muybridge in a Time of Change, we present an evening of Muybridge-inspired dance choreographed and directed by Catherine Galasso; Muybridge-inspired short films chosen by San Francisco Cinematheque’s Steve Polta; and a Muybridge-driven conversation on cinematic space and time led by author Rebecca Solnit.

Source: http://www.sfmoma.org/events/1886#ixzz1NXeYJmx8
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

http://www.sfmoma.org/events/1886#ixzz1NUa2KpZZ

Posted here by Stephen Herbert